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From George & Jo Meng
February, 2001
    It's important to learn to say goodbye whether it be for a time or forever.

    Twenty years ago a friend gave me a notebook he had found as he cleaned an abandoned house in Pennsylvania. On the cover is the name Margaret L. Parke. An inscription on the first page shows that a friend gave it to Margaret in Harrisburg on July 23, 1840.

    Over the years, friends wrote notes in the book to Margaret.  One has always seemed special. It was signed in Lewisburg on August 25, 1851  by Mary J. Reed.


Midi: Romeo
Learn to Say Goodbye
Written in Lewisburg 
On August 25, 1851
by Mary J. Reed.
Submitted by: George & Jo Ellen Meng
meng@chesapeake.net
 
Learn to say Goodbye


    "Good-bye. 

    There is always a deep sadness blended with those simple words. One finds it hard to throw aside a faded wild flower  with whose bloom pleasant thoughts were associated, and tears will often dim the last, lingering look cast upon a landscape whose beauties have become familiar to the eye. 

    How much more than when one 
is called upon to part from friends How much more than when one is called upon to part with friends.
with whom we have held the sweet intercourse of kindly feeling for a time!  When the sad thought is forced upon us that we may see no more the eye whose glance has spoken eloquently from a loving heart, nor hear again the sweet tones of affection.

But a light shineth in the darkness; not fitful or of uncertain brilliancy, but gleaming steadily and clearly; and our hearts are cheered by the thought that this parting will not be forever, even with regard to time. That at some future and perhaps not very far distant period we shall meet again on earth.

     This hope may prove delusive, yet have we a higher, holier, truer one to relieve our sadness: it is that no parting such as this need be forever - that when the last look of earthly affection can cheer our hearts no more, we may enjoy the perfect love of Heaven - and that, in a short space, ties riven by time may be reunited never again to be severed throughout eternity.

     May it be our great object in life to keep this hope pure and steadfast in our hearts!"

     Click on the flower
     to see orignal page.
     This is a large file!

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